Ostomy Uncovered: Peristomal Skin Issues

What is peristomal skin? Peristomal skin is the region of your abdomen around your stoma. It will be the skin that is covered by a stoma bag and probably about a 1-2 inch around the end of your baseplate; a total area of approximately 4 x 4 inches. . If you have a stoma created, this area will forever be covered with a bag. Why is healthy skin important The skin is not meant to be forever covered by a man-made appliance. The skin has seven main functions: Protection of the human body Sensation – transmitting to the brain information…

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Ostomy Uncovered: Filters

What is a Ostomy filter? A filter is integrated into the stoma bag to help with the build up and release of gas from the output produced by the stoma. Most of the modern stoma bags – usually a manufacturers drive line product range – will include a filter within the bag itself, so that odour and gas can be control without the user having to manually deal with this issue. How do they work? Filters are commonly made from charcoal or carbon which helps with the management of odour and ‘ballooning’ due to gas. A filter should pull out…

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Ostomy Uncovered: One Piece v Two Piece Systems

Ostomy Bags are often referred to as ostomy pouches or ostomy appliances. They come in three different types and with numerous options. The three types of ostomy bags are colostomy bags, ileostomy bags and urostomy bags. Within these types of ostomy bags there are many variations. Below is the comparison of a one versus two piece system. Before we begin, we need to go through some of the terminology used when discussing stoma bags: Pouch: the bag which collects waste – urine or feces. Baseplate: the adhesive backing of the bag which sits directly on the skin. When it comes…

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Ostomy Uncovered: Blockages

What is a ostomy blockage? An ostomy blockage is when a stoma becomes blocked. This can happen for many reasons, some simple and easy to resolve, others abit more tricky. But, in any circumstances, ostomy blockages should not be taken lightly. Symptoms are: Thin, clear liquid output with foul odour Cramping abdominal pain near the stoma Decrease in amount of or dark-colored urine Abdominal and stomal swelling. What can cause them? First of all, it’s important to note there are two types: A physical obstruction called a mechanical obstruction, or The loss of the normal muscle contractions in the intestine, called…

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Ostomy Uncovered: How to Change a Stoma Bag

Why is this important? If you have a stoma, you will have to become and get use to change your bag. Depending on the type of stoma you have and the type of bag you choose to use, the timing will vary but hopefully below will show you how to do the basics of changing a stoma bag. NB: It’s important to note that whilst closed pouches (bags) will always be changed when full, drainable and urostomy pouches are best changed went empty. This is, of course, personal preference at the end of the day, but an empty drainable or…

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