Living with an Ostomy

all posts relating to living with a ostomy, day to day. Including leaks, ostomy supplies, bag changes, being out in public, managing output.

The Reminder that I’m Not Normal

I sit in the bathroom, looking straight ahead to my ostomy bags and accessories. I smell the clinical, medical appliance nature of them, but they don’t look medical. I know the feel of my bag, the crinkle of the fabric again my waistband. The grey colour that disappears under my clothes, concealing my medical condition.  An ileostomy. My stoma. Pricilla, the drama queen, coming shockingly into my life 10 months ago. I feel my bags staring back at me. I feel the weight of the bag that sit against my skin. I feel the heavy output inside, the movement of…

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Your Period with an Ostomy

It’s something that happens all of us ladies, but is it something you consider discussing when you get diagnosed with a chronic illness? It certainly wasn’t high on my priority list with my specialist and IBD nurse at the beginning of my #adventureswithachronicillness A little medical history on me: I was diagnosed with PCOS – polycystic ovary syndrome – when I was 16. My IBD diagnosis happened seven years later in 2011. My PCOS was controlled mostly by birth control of which I tried many before a oral contraceptive settled my symptoms down. My periods were light and pretty painless.…

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Waking Up with a Stoma

I had been through recovery before, knew that the groggy fog of the anaesthetic would eventually lift. But this time around I felt utter relief. I was confident this time that this was going to be a new life for me. I felt around under my hospital gown for the scar, for the bag. The scar felt huge and like I had been ripped apart inside but in reality it was neatly glued together, all seven inches of it. The bag sat on my right hand side; I proudly touched it, flinching slightly at pain, feeling the outline gently, hearing…

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Grateful for my Struggle

“In order for me to get here, I had to go there.”   I’ve never really sat down and thought about what having a chronic illness actually means. It means a great deal of things to different people, so there is no one true answer to what having  IBD actually is like. The wide spectrum of symptoms, side effects and general wellbeing leads us down very individual paths. My path has been around since September of 2011. But I’m sure there was a few bricks being laid in the months and even years before that fateful month. My problems were…

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Advice: How to Solve Peristomal Skin Issues

1. Change of stoma size This is important to note in the weeks after your surgery. As the intestine calms down, the size of your stoma goes down too. This means the template you use to cut your ostomy bag will change too. Recommended gap between stoma and your bag should be 1/8” – it should be snug to your stoma but not tight. Tightness can lead to it being strangulated. If it too big, output will seep under the bag, leading to a leak and irritated skin. It is useful in those first weeks to regularly – like every…

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